It is currently November 21st, 2017, 3:15 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Belgian style or oval cast
PostPosted: June 5th, 2007, 7:07 am 
Offline
Member

Joined: May 23rd, 2007, 4:55 pm
Posts: 139
Location: Atlantic Beach & Lee, FL
This from the FFF Caster's newsletter, the Loop. Written by Rick Whirlwood

by Rick Whorlwood
The Belgian cast is also known as the horse shoe cast, oval cast, constant tension cast, swing around cast, side arm back cast, circle cast (not to be confused with a spey cast by the same name) elliptical cast and the Belgian wind cast.

When my steelhead equipment was stowed away, my thoughts turned to salt-water fishing. A trip had been planned for late February. This trip was to concentrate on permit and bonefish. I’ve been very fortunate to have Dr. Gordon Hill, FFF BOG, as my saltwater mentor. Gordy and I play with numerous different fly patterns. We’ll work out new and different designs or tweak well known patterns. My task is to tie these counterfeits and Gordy is the field tester.
During one of our phone conversations we got on the subject of the best cast to throw a permit fly.
Gordy assured me that his experience has lead him to believe that the Belgian type casts are by far the cast of choice.

Interestingly during our early conversations Gordy was kind enough to share some of the history and his experience with the cast. I asked Gordy to please email me the information we had just discussed. With his permission here are the contents of his e-mail:

As I look at it, the Belgian cast, belongs in the
category of elliptical casts, which feature a
distinct change in rod planes between the back cast
and the forward cast. It embodies the principle of
continuous tension. The back cast is made with a
horizontal rod plane, which is low and climbing at
its conclusion . There is no defined stop of the rod
tip, which continues in an elliptical or orbital path
to a forward stroke, using an off-vertical or vertical
rod plane with a straight line rod tip path for
delivery. Done correctly with perfect timing, it
allows for the use of a tight loop despite the
weighted fly which translates to better distance with
minimal effort, greater accuracy, and a straight
leader/line layout needed for permit fishing.
Permit will often pick up the fly and eject it
immediately. No hook-up results unless the angler
can come tight instantly. The straight layout with
no slack is mandatory for this.
Credit for popularizing this class of casts in
Europe has been given to Hans Gebetsroither of
Austria. Hans was head keeper on the Traun River
during the 1930’s. It has been labeled the European
continuous tension cast in many circles.
It became known as the Belgian cast when it
(or variation of it) was used by a Belgian distance
competition caster named Albert Godart to win
an international event in Europe during the late
1930’s.
My Grandfather (Clifford Hewetson) was
present at that event. Years ago, he described the
actual winning cast as what one might call a,
Reverse Belgian cast since he claimed that the back
cast was made with the rod in the vertical plane,
while the forward cast was made with a horizontal
rod plane and a climbing rod tip. He described Albert
as a very heavily muscled stocky man with
tremendous arm strength----a body habitus
sometimes associated with champion soft ball
pitchers.
Confusion sometimes exists as casters discuss
the uses of this cast. On the salt-water flats, I find
it most useful for permit fishing, which requires
accuracy, a straight leader layout, and the ability
to handle bulky weighted crab flies on windy days.
It is one of my most valuable options.
I use the Belgian wind cast as one way to solve
the problem of casting with a strong wind from my
casting side. Here I exaggerate the change of rod
planes by having the rod tip pass over my opposite
shoulder or directly overhead, after swinging
around with continuous tension from a more
horizontal back cast
I use the Belgian cast when I need distance
casting a heavy weighted fly. I hesitate as the back
cast loop straightens. This can be considered a
pause even though my hand keeps moving as I
change rod planes. With careful timing, as the back
cast loop comes completely straight, I come forward
with a tight loop forward cast. That is a
modification of the Belgian cast which works for
me because it yields good distance with a tight loop,
despite the weighted fly.
Gordy Hill, Fla. Keys

After receiving Gordy’s e-mail I contacted Al
Crise, FFF-Master Casting Instructor & FFF-SOC
VP of Education. I asked Al if he would be so kind as
to ask his certified casting instructors study group their
thoughts and opinions on the Belgian Cast.
The information I received was outstanding. Thanks
to all who participated. Al was kind enough to
summarize this information. This is what he wrote:
The constant tension means that you do not
have a back-cast ‘stop’ to put the fly and rod leg in
collision. This alone is a great help with saltwater
casting, where you have heavy or large flies.
Al goes on to list some other situations that you might
use the Belgian cast:
• Bass flies that add increased drag
• When casting a “brace of flies” (two or more)
tangle free
• When making casts that could be bothered
by wind, from the casting arm side.
• When the wind is strong from behind you.
• Using it as a low impact cast.
• Placing the fly under a low obstruction.
• Raising sinking lines that are near the surface.
• Water loading the rod on the pick up.
• Change of direction cast up to 90 degrees.
• Faster presentation for change of direction
• When using split-shot reduces the tangle of
the bolo action
Author’s Note: Bolo is a South America catching
tool, two dissimilar weights on a cord; this causes
an entanglement of small game
• When fishing from a drift-boat ---it can help
keep the line fly out of the boat
• Added accuracy in placing the fly. Reduced
back-cast area is needed due to the ‘circle’
not the straight back-cast.
• Also you can add a haul to increase line speed
on both the pick-up and presentation cast.


 
 Profile Email  
 
 Post subject: Re: Belgian style or oval cast
PostPosted: June 5th, 2007, 10:21 am 
Offline
Education FCFF

Joined: May 17th, 2007, 7:57 pm
Posts: 1295
Location: Orange Park, FL
David,

Thanks for posting this information....very interesting. What would you recommend as the sequence of events (fasle casting and shooting) for someone fishing in a kayak with all of the leader out of the tip but the fly line only about an inch or two out of the tip.....fish is about 40 to 50 feet away and wind at 10 to 15 across my right handed casting arm?

What I would usually do (besides pray) is throw it viriticaly up in the air or try to tighten my loop and lower my plane towards the water. This might be a nice alternative.

Thanks.

Bart


Last edited by Bartman on June 6th, 2007, 7:29 am, edited 1 time in total

 
 Profile Email  
 
 Post subject: Re: Belgian style or oval cast
PostPosted: June 5th, 2007, 9:19 pm 
Offline
Member

Joined: May 21st, 2007, 8:09 pm
Posts: 25
Great info David! Bart, why are you keeping so little line outside the rod tip? I usually keep at least five feet out with the fly hooked a notch on the carry strap of the kayak, excess line just floats along side the yak.


 
 Profile Email  
 
 Post subject: Re: Belgian style or oval cast
PostPosted: June 5th, 2007, 9:35 pm 
Offline
Member

Joined: May 17th, 2007, 5:55 pm
Posts: 701
Bob Clouser showed me this cast when he was here. I now use it as my standard downwind cast when it's blowing hard. No effort at all.
After reading the article, I think I will also use this cast when the wind is over my right shoulder (I am right handed). Make the big loop and shoot the line forward over my left shoulder. I'm anxious to try it, but I wouldn't mind waiting for a while. We've had enought wind for the past 2-3 months.


 
 Profile Email  
 
 Post subject: Re: Belgian style or oval cast
PostPosted: June 6th, 2007, 6:56 am 
Offline
Education FCFF

Joined: May 17th, 2007, 7:57 pm
Posts: 1295
Location: Orange Park, FL
Greg McC wrote:
Bart, why are you keeping so little line outside the rod tip? I usually keep at least five feet out with the fly hooked a notch on the carry strap of the kayak, excess line just floats along side the yak.


That is a good question Greg. I have tried everything to minimize line fouling prior to casting. For me, the best is to keep almost all of the fly line inside the rod--I usually keep the hook on the support leg of the first stripping guide.

When I drag the line beside my yak it usually will get foulded by my paddle or it will get under my yak and get hung on one of the many oyster scars on the bottom of my boat.

Bart


 
 Profile Email  
 
 Post subject: Re: Belgian style or oval cast
PostPosted: June 6th, 2007, 8:48 am 
Offline
Ex-President

Joined: May 18th, 2007, 7:44 am
Posts: 1153
This sounds like the technique we would use when Steelhead fishing in the winter. It was the only way to cast a heavy spit shot above a long light tippet without tangling.


 
 Profile Email  
 
 Post subject: Re: Belgian style or oval cast
PostPosted: July 9th, 2007, 6:28 am 
Offline
Member

Joined: May 17th, 2007, 6:11 pm
Posts: 725
Location: Jax Southside@Tinseltown West
Here's an intererting article from MidCurrent I found on the Belgian cast. As you guys have covered a lot of this already here's more......

http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/tech ... lgian.aspx

_________________
Capt.Rich Santos
http://www.FlyFishJax.com


 
 Profile Email  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2002, 2006 phpBB Group