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 Post subject: Why is my front 'backcast' better than my front 'forward' c
PostPosted: October 14th, 2008, 7:55 am 
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Joined: March 14th, 2008, 2:25 pm
Posts: 103
Location: St Johns County
I have noticed of late during lawn practice that I have developed what I believe y'all call
a "tailing loop"" on my front forward cast. It seems to show itself I get past about 40'.
Strange thing is when I practice a front backcast, no messy loop.
However, when I'm actually fishing, it hasnt affected me too much.

What is going on ?

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-Brad


 
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 Post subject: Re: Why is my front 'backcast' better than my front 'forward' c
PostPosted: October 15th, 2008, 7:59 am 
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Joined: May 23rd, 2007, 4:55 pm
Posts: 139
Location: Atlantic Beach & Lee, FL
LoTide wrote:
I have noticed of late during lawn practice that I have developed what I believe y'all call
a "tailing loop"" on my front forward cast. It seems to show itself I get past about 40'.
Strange thing is when I practice a front backcast, no messy loop.
However, when I'm actually fishing, it hasnt affected me too much.

What is going on ?


Brad, I'm a little confused by the terms front forward cast and front backcast. Do you mean that when you deliver the cast (as in delivering to a fish), you get a tailing loop on a conventional forward (or delivery) cast?

If so, it's an oft-heard complaint. Tailers generally are caused by applying poor acceleration through the casting stroke, usually early in the cast. This happens as a result of these and other reasons:

1. if you start too fast, then slow up during the cast;
2. if you apply too much "force" during the cast;
3. if you are uneven in your acceleration on the forward cast;
4. if you lose the tension by waiting too long to begin your forward cast, then 'jerk' the rod tip as the line tension catches up with the rod.
5. other causes, too.

All of the above create a concave rod path, where the rod dips below the (imaginary) straight-line path of the rod tip, then straightens moving in a direction from low to high. This creates a sort-of bowl shaped path of the tip, which caused the top/fly leg of the fly line to drop down over the bottom/rod leg of the line.

To correct for all except #4 & 5, begin the forward cast slowly, then accelerate/speed up evenly through a longer stroke, where the final wrist rotation (speed-up-and-stop, whump, power stroke) comes later in the casting stroke.

To correct for #4, begin the forward stroke sooner, but not faster, so the line continues to hold the rod tip under tension; then, begin the stroke as in the corrections above. If you can't seem to get it fixed, email me at smartcasts@gmail.com. I can get you straightened out. I'm starting to do lessons again.

David Lambert


 
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 Post subject: Re: Why is my front 'backcast' better than my front 'forward' c
PostPosted: October 15th, 2008, 9:15 am 
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Joined: March 14th, 2008, 2:25 pm
Posts: 103
Location: St Johns County
Dave,

Sorry my descripton was lacking - if I 'delivered' the fly with a backcast, I dont see the TLoop.

Last eve I went out with just 30' and tried to self diagnose. Some progress.
I'll try some of your suggestions and make note of the lessons' email.
I plan to be at the OCT 18 demo. Hope to see you there.

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-Brad


 
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