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 Post subject: FLYLINES
PostPosted: October 21st, 2008, 10:34 pm 
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Posts: 239
Article about flyline construction and maintenance.
http://www.americanangler.com/index.php ... 6&Itemid=0


 
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 Post subject: How Tapers Affect FLYLINES
PostPosted: October 23rd, 2008, 6:56 am 
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Joined: May 23rd, 2007, 4:55 pm
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Location: Atlantic Beach & Lee, FL
That is a very informative article. But, as the article states, it does not discuss tapers, probably the most useful information to the average angler when s/he wants to buy a flyline. I'm working on a piece about that now. I'll post some of it with images of different tapers and try to simply explain the physics behind them in a week.

Here's some nutshell physics behind line design: Since energy can neither be gained nor lost, it must be conserved through transformation. Energy in a snapping bull whip runs through the whip and out the tip, where it converts to sound energy (the crack) and others.

For those interested, the physics equation for conservation of energy is K=1/2mV2(squared). For our purposes, the equation means that as the mass of a fly line (diameter) decreases by half, the energy moving through it (velocity) increases by the square of itself.

In short, as a flyline tapers down, the velocity of the energy running through it increases. As a line tapers down, the velocity increases. Imagine a tapered hose nozzle: As you close down the opening, the water squirts faster and farther. The volume of water has remained the same, as has the original water pressure. Open the nozzle all the way and water blurbles out, not sprays or quirts.

A short, fast taper will turn the loop over faster and with more energy -- great for Clousers and wind resistant bass bugs.

Build a long slow taper and the energy passes through it more slowly, relatively, which provides a slower, more delicate turnover, say for trout flies or bonefish flies.

Remember, most fly lines have two tapers, one at both ends of the head of the fly line. Those tapers can be different, relative to what the line is designed to do.

Class over. Questions?

David


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 Post subject: Re: FLYLINES
PostPosted: October 23rd, 2008, 3:24 pm 
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Joined: May 27th, 2007, 4:24 pm
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Knowledge can be especially fun when applied towards something you enjoy! After all, isn't that what flyfishing is all about? Having fun! The FCFF'ers has among its' membership knowledgeable individuals that continue to act as a beacon that guides those of us seeking to improve their skill level of this great sport while having a good time. I thank all of you. Question: When is that casting analyzer suppose to arrive? I can't wait!


 
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